My dear Jewish friend 8: Remembering and committing as Police

I carefully placed the large candles on both sides of the table, then arranged the white framed picture, book and the program in the center. As the candles burned I waited in the quietness of the morning for my colleagues for the briefing and the following holocaust remembrance. For me it was a tripple commitment as a German citizen, Christian pastor, and now working for the Federal Police since almost a year. The epaulet with a golden cross on my shoulder visiualized my double responsibility for the church and the Federal Police.

When I broke the news to you over a year ago that I would be leaving New York to be called to the Federal Police we shed tears. We instantly knew that something special would very soon be no longer part of our routine: the strolls in our neighbourhood chatting about our lives, working together in your food pantry for the poor, and sharing joy, laughter, and tears.

Even though I still can’t get used to be so far away – to be exact 3.923 miles – this January morning gave me the feeling that our pain of distance at least makes some sense as I remembered with other leading police officers the crimes of the Holocaust. When the Police director spoke of the responsibility remembering and committing to never forget what had happened to your people and so many others during the Nazi horrors, my heartbeat increased. I was proud to hear that the German Police, which was complicit like many other institutions including my Bavarian Lutheran Church, commits to securing human rights and the German constitution.

This commitment is central as I teach young police trainees in ethical decision making. But let me try to briefly recall what happened back then with policing making the Police force a significant element of the muderous Nazi-regime. (For further information follow the link to the German article about Policing during the Third Reich)

The rise of the Hitler movement began against the background of economic and
political crisis of the Weimar Republic. The brutal regime took advantage of the difficult situation of million Germans. Hitler and others in power legally created system of injustice that was aimed at installing a National Socialist-oriented community, which was „liberated“ from any „un-German spirit“.

Essential feature was the so-called „Verreichlichung“, in which the Police force was centralised by the Nazi rulers and became its outward appearance through the „Reichssicherheitshauptamtes“ (Reich Security Main Office) in 1939. From spring 1933 until the end of the war in 1945 the police apparatus received extensive new possibilities to intervene and monitor. In addition, the boundary between „law enforcement“ and „security police“ become blurred in favour of the SS, which ultimately held all powers. To make things worse, the population supported the daily terror of the Secret State Police by
willingly denunciating their fellow citizens.

Police battalions and task forces not only took part in the organisation of the Holocaust in the Germany and occupied areas, but were involved in mass shootings in East Europe and therefore directly took part in the Nazi genocide.

After celebrating six very meaningful Holocaust Remembrance Days in New York, it was this day that added an important mew layer to my commitment as a German citizen, and a pastor working in and for the German Federal Police. May we learn from the disaster of the Holocaust to never make it happen again to anyone, no matter what religion, nationality, or skin color the person might have.

Gelebte Kirchengemeinschaft und biographische Wege der Einheit

Drei wichtige konfessionelle Stationen breiteten sich auf meinem Schreibtisch aus. Vorsichtig strich ich über das handgefertigte lutherische Leinenbeffchen, die mit bunten Stickereien geschmückte Stola aus dem reformierten Schottland und den samtweichen Doktorhut des methodistischen Wesley Theological Seminary aus Washington, D.C.

Hier war vereint, was vielfach über Jahrhunderte unversöhnlich in Europa nebeneinander existierte, und in meiner Biografie zur einer Einheit zusammengewachsen war: Lutherische, reformierte und methodistische Theologie.

Frisch in der Lutherischen Kirche in Bayern ordiniert hatte ich mich auf der Grundlage der Leuenberger Konkordie, die 1973 im Schweizer Tagungshaus Leuenberg in Hölstein bei Basel zwischen den verschiedenen Konfessionen geschlossen wurde, auf den Weg in das reformierte Schottland gemacht, um dort als Pfarrerin in Orkney zu arbeiten. Da aber eine Presbyterin fürchtete, eine „katholische“ Geistliche aus Bayern könne im streng reformierten Schottland eingeschleust werden, durchlief ich neben der Pfarramtsführung ein verkürztes Vikariat nebst Examen. Was zunächst ärgerlich erschien, wurde mir zum Segen, der mir wertvolle Einblicke in eine Geschwisterkirche und deren Theologie gewährte. Bei meiner Installation in Schottland vereinte ich in meiner Person sowohl lutherische als auch reformierte Glaubensgrundlagen. Für mich eine wunderbare Bereicherung, die meine Theologie auf einen breiteren gedanklichen und spirituellen Horizont stellte.

Jahre später während meines Auslandspfarramtes in New York, USA, wurde mein Horizont noch weiter als ich am methodistischen Wesley Theological Seminary neben einer Vollzeitstelle als EKD-Auslandspfarrerin in Public Theology promovierte. Voller Faszination lernte ich die methodistische Kirche und ihr wichtiges Engagement um soziale Gerechtigkeit kennen, die in der Theologie John Wesleys begründet ist. Mit der Annahme meiner Dissertation im April 2020 vereinten sich ab diesem Zeitpunkt drei Konfessionen in meiner Biografie und meiner Tätigkeit als Pfarrerin.

Meine Freude war daher groß, als ich von dem wichtigen Schritt der drei Kirchen erfuhr, die einen leichteren Übertritt zwischen evangelischen Kirchen in Bayern ermöglicht. Wichtige Schritte zu einer Einheit, die so nötig ist und von der ich weiterhin träume und nicht ablassen werde, mich dafür zu engagieren. Möge, was sich in meiner Biografie vereinen lässt, auch an anderen Stellen heilsam und den Glauben stärkend zusammenwachsen.

My dear Jewish friend 7: Shabbat Shira, the New Year of the Trees and songs of praise

After riding with my bicycle through a cold starry January evening to the local synagogue in Bamberg, I thankfully entered the warm and cozy building. Rabbi Dr. Almekias-Siegl had invited me for the Shabbat service and the following festive evening of Tu B´Shvat. As I sat down in a pew, my cold and stiff limbs started to thaw with every word spoken and every song rising.

When Rabbi Dr. Almekias-Siegl explained in his sermon that this evening was Shabbat Shira, my thoughts immediately traveled across the miles to your synagogue and Rabbi Shira Milgrom. My heart silently began to sing as I was reminded of you. What a coincidence to be invited on Shabbat Shira to this synagogue. I suddenly understood why the Rabbi had pointed out to others that my first name was Miriam (as you know in Germany you usually call each other by the surname). It never occurred to me that the names „Shira“ and „Miriam“ are closely intertwined in such significant ways. This special Shabbat not only flabbergasted me, but helped me to understand more about our shared commitment. Shabbat Shira emphasises the Song of the Sea and the Miriams song, which has always has been near to my heart. It is one of the greatest songs of the Torah:

I will sing to the LORD, for he has triumphed gloriously;

horse and rider he has thrown into the sea.

The LORD is my strength and my might,

and he has become my salvation;

this is my God, and I will praise him,

my father’s God, and I will exalt him.

The LORD is a warrior;

the LORD is his name.

“Pharaoh’s chariots and his army he cast into the sea;

his picked officers were sunk in the Red Sea.

The floods covered them;

they went down into the depths like a stone.

Your right hand, O LORD, glorious in power—

your right hand, O LORD, shattered the enemy.

In the greatness of your majesty you overthrew your adversaries;

you sent out your fury, it consumed them like stubble.

At the blast of your nostrils the waters piled up,

the floods stood up in a heap;

the deeps congealed in the heart of the sea.

The enemy said, ‘I will pursue, I will overtake,

I will divide the spoil, my desire shall have its fill of them.

I will draw my sword, my hand shall destroy them.’

You blew with your wind, the sea covered them;

they sank like lead in the mighty waters.

Who is like you, O LORD, among the gods?

Who is like you, majestic in holiness,

awesome in splendor, doing wonders?

You stretched out your right hand,

the earth swallowed them.

In your steadfast love you led the people whom you redeemed;

you guided them by your strength to your holy abode.

The peoples heard, they trembled;

pangs seized the inhabitants of Philistia.

Then the chiefs of Edom were dismayed;

trembling seized the leaders of Moab;

all the inhabitants of Canaan melted away.

Terror and dread fell upon them;

by the might of your arm, they became still as a stone

until your people, O LORD, passed by,

until the people whom you acquired passed by.

You brought them in and planted them on the mountain of your own possession,

the place, O LORD, that you made your abode,

the sanctuary, O LORD, that your hands have established.

The LORD willI will sing to the LORD, for he has triumphed gloriously;

horse and rider he has thrown into the sea.

The LORD is my strength and my might,

and he has become my salvation;

this is my God, and I will praise him,

my father’s God, and I will exalt him.

The LORD is a warrior;

the LORD is his name.

“Pharaoh’s chariots and his army he cast into the sea;

his picked officers were sunk in the Red Sea.

The floods covered them;

they went down into the depths like a stone.

Your right hand, O LORD, glorious in power—

your right hand, O LORD, shattered the enemy.

In the greatness of your majesty you overthrew your adversaries;

you sent out your fury, it consumed them like stubble.

At the blast of your nostrils the waters piled up,

the floods stood up in a heap;

the deeps congealed in the heart of the sea.

The enemy said, ‘I will pursue, I will overtake,

I will divide the spoil, my desire shall have its fill of them.

I will draw my sword, my hand shall destroy them.’

You blew with your wind, the sea covered them;

they sank like lead in the mighty waters.

Who is like you, O LORD, among the gods?

Who is like you, majestic in holiness,

awesome in splendor, doing wonders?

You stretched out your right hand,

the earth swallowed them.

In your steadfast love you led the people whom you redeemed;

you guided them by your strength to your holy abode.

The peoples heard, they trembled;

pangs seized the inhabitants of Philistia.

Then the chiefs of Edom were dismayed;

trembling seized the leaders of Moab;

all the inhabitants of Canaan melted away.

Terror and dread fell upon them;

by the might of your arm, they became still as a stone

until your people, O LORD, passed by,

until the people whom you acquired passed by.

You brought them in and planted them on the mountain of your own possession,

the place, O LORD, that you made your abode,

the sanctuary, O LORD, that your hands have established.

The LORD will reign forever and ever. reign forever and ever.

Exodus 15:1-18

It is the song of the people of Israel at the Red Sea, when your people were saved from the pharaoh through G´d. Being named after biblical Miriam, I was always drawn to the story of the exodus. Many a times I shivered about the pressure, toil and hardship Israel had to bear in Egypt, the plagues, and the miracles Moses performed through G´d.

For me as a Lutheran pastor committed to seeking peace and justice, this story is a symbol of triumph after difficult times and that G´ds promise of justice and freedom can be reached. Many times it takes the struggles of numerous generations until justice becomes reality.

But how quickly do we get used to a peaceful and just surrounding? You and I, we both had the privilege to grow up in peaceful times. Through the history of our nations, which are intertwined through the murderous crimes of the Holocaust, we should remember with huge thankfulness that we are blessed with peace.

The nearness of Tu B´Shvat on this Shabbat may help us to remember that the Creator has provided us with everything we need. The New Year of the trees celebrates the fruit of the tree, the vegetables, the plants that give air to the world and so much more. As the Rabbi shared his memories of celebrating „the New Year of the Trees“ in Israel I could feel the joy spreading in the small diaspora synagogue and once more my longing to visit Israel has been awakened again. (I truly hope to be able to spend time there as soon as this pandemic is over.) As we entered the small communal space on the ground floor, a beautiful meal was prepared for us with more fruits than we could eat and we indulged in fruits, which came from your homeland Israel.

As I ate the carefully selected and beautifully presented fruits, I had to think of all the blessings laid into my life. I don’t have to worry about food or a roof over my head, and am blessed in so many ways. But how often do we forget that the basic things in life are small wonders in themselves? Working in your pantry, getting to know your synagogue, and experiencing how quickly even basic things like food can be taken from you, have changed my perspective both on the song of Miriam and the basic things in life.

I think it is our challenge, to recognise the everyday gifts received from above, and to share these blessings with those, who are less fortunate than us. For them they are wonders and free those, who are less fortunate from their bondage hunger and economical troubles. May our actions become very practical, recognisable songs of Miriam as we use our hands, hearts, and lips to give praise to the one, who has called us to pursue peace and justice.

Jahresabschluss, steinerne Rinnen und weise Worte aus Übersee

Das klare Wasser gurgelte eine sanfte Melodie, die vom magischen Rhythmus der Natur angetrieben ein niemals endendes Lied der Schöpferkraft Gottes vor sich hin sang. Gebannt hatte ich mich vorsichtig über das steinerne Naturwunder gebeugt und beobachtete Faszination den Lauf des frischen Wassers, dessen Weg von einer moosbewachsenen Rinne geführt sanft den Berg hinabführte.

Es tat gut, an diesem letzten Tag des Jahres 2021 einen Familienausflug an diesen besonderen Ort zu machen. Ein turbulentes, von vielen Veränderungen, Erschütterungen und kulturellen Wechseln geprägtes Jahr lag nun fast hinter uns. Ich seufzte still und atmete die klare Waldluft ein während das sanfte Gurgeln des Wassers mein Herz, das durchaus aufgrund der Veränderung in große Unruhe im letzten Jahr geraten war, mit wohltuender im Moment liegender Stille erfüllte.

Über einen angenehmen, leichten Wanderweg erreichten wir innerhalb von ca. 20 min die steinerne Rinne bei Roschlaub, Gemeinde Scheßlitz. Schon lange hatte ich mir gewünscht, dieses Naturschauspiel zu besuchen. Durch die Ausfällung von Kalziumkarbonat entsteht das quellnahe Hochbett eines Baches in Karstlandschaften. Die steinerne Rinne bei Roschlaub wächst im Jahr 2-3 mm. Wie wunderbar, dass ein solches Naturwunder nun weniger als eine halbe Stunde Autofahrt von uns entfernt war.

Gebannt sah ich zu, wie Blätter und kleine Äste wie von Geisterhand bis zum Fuß der Rinne transportiert wurden und dort als Untergrund für das quellnahe Hochbett dienten. Ein wenig erinnerte mich dieser Naturvorgang an die Worte des Theologen Howard Thurman (1899-1981), der als Nachfahre afro-amerikanischer Sklaven in den damals von Rassentrennung dominierten Südstaaten Amerikas aufgewachsen war. Er wusste aufgrund der der Geschichte seiner Familie und seiner eigenen Lebensgeschichte in einer von Rassentrennung geprägten USA, wie schwer das Leben spielen und Erfahrungen eine Person prägen konnte. Was ihn aber auszeichnete und sehr dem Mechanismus der Rinne ähnelte, war der Umgang mit schweren Erfahrungen:

We can use our memory of the past with creative discrimination. We can lift out of the past those things what will give us reinforcement as we face the future, that will give us courage, that will lift the ceiling of our hopes as we look toward the tomorrow. Because of what we have learned form this aspect of our past, we are reinforced for the future. We can thereby let the past become something more than history: something that tutors us as we move into the new year. Now that we know this, we may heal ourselves in the light of this judgement. The past is history but the past is alive, because the past is in us.

Howard Thurman, The Mood of Christmas & other celebrations, p. 181.

Wie die steinerne Rinne Blätter, kleine Äste und Kalziumkarbonat für ihr Wachstum nutzt, anstatt an ihnen zugrunde zu gehen, so können wir die Erfahrungen unseres Lebens nutzen. Es ist unsere Entscheidung, ob wir, wie Thurman schreibt, durch die schweren Geschehnisse unserer Vergangenheit uns dem Pessimismus zuwenden oder der schweren Vergangenheit mit einem kreativen Urteilsvermögen entgegentreten. Ein Urteilsvermögen, das aus dem Geschehen für die Zukunft lernt und dadurch Zukunft ermöglicht.

Ein wenig wie die steinerne Rinne, die ihre Herausforderung von Naturmaterial, Moos, Kalk und Wasser für das eigene Wachstum nutzt.

Liebe Leserin, lieber Leser, ich wünsche euch die Zuversicht und den Mut Howard Thurmans. Mögen die Erfahrungen des Jahres 2021 und die weiterer Jahre euch zum Segen werden, damit ihr einer hoffnungsvollen Zukunft gestärkt durch eure Erfahrungen in 2022 und darüber hinaus entgegen wachsen könnt.

My dear Jewish friend 6: Shalom and Shared Roots of Faith

When entering our apartment, my hand softly touched the Hebrew letters of שלום. Shalom. Peace. Frieden. I sighed deeply as the well-known words of the Shema Israel came over my lips. Protected by a beautiful bright blue outside the small parchment scroll of the Mezuzah contained important parts of the Holy Scriptures (1) and was a precious memory of seven years in New York.

Hear, O Israel: The LORD is our God, the LORD alone. You shall love the LORD your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your might.

Deut 6,4-5

Shalom. Peace. Frieden.

Our world is struggling heavily to find peace. Despite a raging pandemic, a large portion of our world is still engulfed in different conflicts and wars. (2) What a terrible fact as Christianity is celebrating Christmastide and all nations are heading for the New Year!

Year after year I am hoping for peace to come. Even though you and I live in peaceful nations, many are not as fortunate. My own nation has not lived up to the basic religious principal engrained into Judaism and Christianity. During the Nazi dictatorship most Germans were official members of the Roman Catholic or Protestant Churches, but didn’t live up to the concept of shalom. Instead, they were eagerly part of a murderous, diabolical system. Large numbers did not simply forget the connections between Judaism and Christianity, but some very actively tried to destroy every trace of shared values.

When on a very cold night of November 9 the local Rabbi Dr. Salomon Almekias-Siegl came to our Christian home, it felt as if a tide of personal family history was turning in healing ways. It could have not been a more touching date for installing our Mezuzah at the apartment door of our German Christian family. On what is today known as „Kristallnacht“ (3), from November 9 to 10, 1938 when synagogues and Jewish property were burned and destroyed on a large scale, and hundreds Jews were killed or driven to commit suicide, it was this gesture of שלום that deeply moved us.

After checking that the small scroll was kosher, the Rabbi spoke the blessing hanging the mezuzah slanted on the right side of the door, facing inwards towards our apartment. My thoughts went to the biblical story of the Rabbi Jesus discussing religious matters with scribes where he referred to the Shema Israel and the commandment to love neighbour and self as the highest commandments of faith (Marc 12:28-31). If only the perpetrators of the Nazi dictatorship large and small would have lived up to this commandment instead of killing millions of Jews!

Now, day after day, as I pass through our door, the bright blue Mezuzah and its silver letters remind me that the way to שלום is adhering to these fundamental commandments, which bind Judaism and Christianity together. I am so thankful for this reminder, which was installed on one a night that reminds us of one of the darkest night in German history.

Shalom. Peace. Frieden.

With every new day rising and every passing through our doorway my hope grows that God´s kingdom will grow in our broken world by love we show God and our neighbour.


(1) Deuteronomy 6:4-9 and 11:13-21.

(2) Statista:

(3) The Night of Broken Glass

Überlebenskampf der anderen Art

Wie Kirchen in USA in Zeiten von Corona um ihr Bestehen kämpfen

Betroffenes Schweigen breitete sich im digitalen Meeting der Pfarrkonferenz aus. Die sonst so fröhlichen und positiven Gesichter meiner Kolleginnen und Kollegen spiegelten den gemeinsamen Schmerz und die in ihnen aufkeimende Angst wieder. „Man! I am so sorry to hear that! We´ll be prayin` for you and your congregation.“ Während der sonst immer so fröhlichen Ankommensrunde, hatte ein Kollege von seiner gegenwärtigen Situation berichtet. Nachdem er selbst im Frühling mit COVID erkrankt war, musste er sich zusammen mit seiner Gemeinde nun einem Überlebenskampf der anderen Art stellen: Aufgrund der stark gefallenen Einnahmen seiner Gemeinde, die sich aus Mitgliedsbeiträgen und Vermietungen des Gebäudes speisten, hatte die Gemeindeleitung ihm mitgeteilt, dass sie in den kommenden Wochen sein Gehalt nicht mehr zahlen könne.

In den USA finanzieren sich protestantische Kirchengemeinden selbst. Sie speisen sich weder aus einer Kirchensteuer wie in Deutschland, noch einem Solidaritätsprinzip wie in Schottland. Sie sind dem Gesetz des Marktes ebenso ausgesetzt wie ein Geschäft oder ein Sportverein. Auf diesem religiösen Markt müssen sie sich mit ihrem Angebot behaupten und sind direkt auf die Unterstützung ihrer Mitglieder angewiesen. Im Zuge der Pandemie erleben die Vereinigten Staaten eine der schwersten dokumentierten wirtschaftlichen Krisen. Allein im Staat New York sind laut dem „Bureau for Labor Statistics“ 15.7 % der Arbeitnehmer im Juni 2020 arbeitslos. Diese Entwicklung betrifft umgehend Kirchen, die in direkter Weise von den Zuwendungen ihrer Mitglieder abhängig sind. Da aufgrund der Pandemie weitere Einnahmequellen wie Vermietungen und Veranstaltungen ebenso entfallen, haben zahlreiche Kirchengemeinden existenziellen Probleme, die selbst vor einem Pfarrgehalt nicht Halt machen.

Erste Initiativen wie „Churches helping Churches„, die von Justin Giboney gegründet worden war, versuchen basierend auf den biblischen Vorbild ein Solidaritätsangebot in dieser Notsituation bereitzustellen. Im Mittelpunkt steht hierbei ein Bericht aus der Apostelgeschichte:

Sie verkauften Güter und Habe und teilten sie aus unter alle, je nachdem es einer nötig hatte.

Apg 2,45 (Lut 2017)

Inzwischen ist mit einer Pandemie, die über ein halbes Jahr die Vereinigten Staaten und deren ökonomische Talfahrt prägt, jede Form der Hilfe vor allem für kleine und mittlere Gemeinden überlebenswichtig, denn fast ein Fünftel der protestantischen Kirchen verfügt laut einer in 2017 durchgeführten Umfrage von LifeWay Research verfügt nur die Hälfte der Kirchen 2017 über lebensnotwendige Reserven, die ein Weiterbestehen im extremen Einnahmeausfall von höchstens 15 Wochen (sog. „Rainy Day Funds“) sichert. Besonders betroffen sind hierbei Minoritätskirchen, die auf eine besondere Zielgruppe zugehen und durch eine überschaubare, kleine Mitgliederschaft gekennzeichnet sind. Besonders kleine afro-amerikanische Kirchen seien hierbei laut Barna in großer Gefahr. Doch dieser Trend gilt ebenso für andere, kleine und vielleicht in ihrem Profil spezialisierte Kirchen.

Durch die ökonomischen Auswirkungen der Pandemie wird sich in den USA die Vielfalt der religiösen Landschaft massiv verändern. Es ist davon auszugehen, dass manche Glaubensrichtung in gewissen Landstrichen unterversorgt sein wird, da schlicht ein adäquates und räumlich zugängliches Angebot fehlt. Selbstverständlich kann ein digitales Angebot Entfernungen überbrücken und Zugang zu gottesdienstlichen und geistlichen Veranstaltungen ermöglichen. Doch aus meiner Sicht zeichnet Kirche vor allem aus, dass sie mit Bonhoeffer gesprochen für andere da ist und sich um die Bedürfnisse derer kümmert, die sich am Rande der Gesellschaft befinden. Gerade in den USA, wo es keine vergleichbare Institution wie die Diakonie gibt, sind viele angewiesen auf greifbare Hilfe vor Ort durch Tafeln, Kleiderkamern und andere diakonische Initiativen, die bis dato von Kirchengemeinden übernommen wurden. Durch das Sterben kleiner Gemeinden wird auch die Hilfe für die Ärmsten der Armen weniger zahlreich und zugänglich werden. Eine weitere bittere Auswirkung der Pandemie.

Selbstverständlich spürt auch die Kirche in Deutschland die finanziellen Auswirkungen der Pandemie. Die neuesten Kirchenaustrittszahlen sind sicherlich auch dieser weltweiten Krise mit geschuldet. Doch nehme ich ein sehr besonnenes Handeln in Kirchenleitungsebenen wahr, die bereits vor der Pandemie wie der bayerische Zukunftsprozess „Profil und Konzentration“. Hier wird versucht, Zukunft nicht nur zu denken, sondern bereits in der Gegenwart durch Projekte und Umstrukturierung zu ermöglichen.

Vor allem in Zeiten wie Corona wäre ein etabliertes Solidaritätsprinzip und ein Reformprozess dringend notwendig, aber dieser aufgrund der losen Verbindung bzw. kompletten Eigenständigkeit von Kirchengemeinden undenkbar. Dafür trifft diese die ökonomischen Auswirkungen in oftmals existenzieller Weise.

Das spürt nun die Gemeinde des Kollegen in direkter Form. Nachdem er diese Nachricht an uns weitergegeben hatte, wich das Schweigen erst nach langen Schrecksekunden einer geschäftigen Runde von Fragen und Ratschlägen. Allen dämmerte sehr schnell, dass je länger die Pandemie anhalten würde, diese Situation keine einzelne bleiben würde.